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Intellectual Property

In this high-tech era, it is unavoidable for us to be involved with intellectual property in one way or another. Novelties, say a bladeless fan, a smart phone or disinfectants, are the fruit of a much research and development that cumulated in patents. While sharing or using information on social media, we could inadvertently also become an infringer if we do not keep a vigilant eye.

Here at ONC, we understand how intellectual property contributes enormously both to technology advancement and economic development. Without adequate protection to intellectual property rights, entrepreneurs could not reap the full benefits of their investment and might become unwilling to innovate. Consumer confidence would also be undermined as the safety and quality of products lack guarantee.

Our Intellectual Property Department offers a wide array of services both in Hong Kong, China and other parts of the world, including both contentious and non-contentious IP work.

We assist our clients in a wide array of IP services, including advising on protection strategies, determining the scope of protection, the registration, exploitation and protection of their intellectual property rights in copyright, trade marks, patents, registered designs, rights in confidential information and other related legal rights, brand management, IP transactions etc., for their products and services.

We represent some of the most world-renowned brands in various industries such as media/entertainment, luxury goods, fashion, electronics and consumables products etc., including many brands that have been identified as the World’s Most Valuable Brands by Forbes and Interbrand.

If you would like to know more about our intellectual property practice or how we can help your business, please contact us at (852) 2810 1212 or at ip@onc.hk.

Please refer to our articles in ‘Knowledge’

Our People

Ludwig Ng
Ludwig Ng
Senior Partner
Lawrence Yeung
Lawrence Yeung
Partner
Ludwig Ng
Ludwig Ng
Senior Partner
Lawrence Yeung
Lawrence Yeung
Partner

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