More

Shipping & Logistics

We provide comprehensive services in both contentious and non-contentious aspects of shipping law, including charterparties, shipbuilding, shipping casualties, sale and purchase of vessels, ship arrest and release, international sale of goods, ship financing, cargo claims, bills of lading, letters of credit, marine insurance and other cross-border transport disputes.

Examples of the matters which we regularly deal with are:

  • handling disputes, whether by way of arbitration or litigation, arising from charterparties, shipbuilding contracts, ship collision, international sale of goods, sale and purchase of vessels, cargo claims, bills of lading, letters of credit and related insurance issues;
  • drafting, reviewing and advising on the terms of charterparties, shipbuilding contracts, GAFTA and FOSFA contracts, memorandum of agreements and ship mortgage documents;and
  • assisting shipowners and charterers in both arresting vessels and securing their release.

Our clients include shipowners, P&I Clubs, charterers, ship and chartering brokers, cargo insurers, tug companies, ship-repairers, banks, marine engineering companies, oil companies, bunker suppliers, government agencies and multinational conglomerates.


If you would like to know more about our shipping and logistics practice or how we can help your business, please contact us at (852) 2810 1212 or at shipping@onc.hk.


Please refer to our articles in ‘Knowledge’

Our People

Sherman Yan
Sherman Yan
Managing Partner
Eric Woo
Eric Woo
Partner
Sherman Yan
Sherman Yan
Managing Partner
Eric Woo
Eric Woo
Partner

Recommended Posts

Can ship owners claim damages for loss of cargo in addition to demurrage when a ship is detained beyond laytime?
In a recent English High Court decision K-Line Pte Ltd v Priminds Shipping (HK) Co., Ltd [2020] EWHC 2373 (Comm), the Court considers whether an owner is entitled to claim damages in addition to demurrage where the only breach of contract of affreightment by the charterer is the failure to complete loading / discharging cargo within laytime. It was held that ship owner has a right to claim damages over and above its right to demurrage without the need to prove a separate breach.
How would the court interpret an expressly agreed term which conflicts with a general printed term in a bunker supply contract?
In the recent English case Septo Trading Inc v Tintrade Ltd [2021] EWCA Civ 718, the English Court of Appeal (the “Court”) considered whether there is inconsistency between a printed general term and a specifically agreed term and the effect of an inconsistent term. The Court reiterated that in determining whether such inconsistency exists, the test lies as to whether the two provisions can be fairly and sensibly read together and it is necessary to ascertain the intention of the parties in the commercial setting.
Can a term be implied into a charterparty guarantee limiting the shipowner’s right to seek security?
In the recent English case CVLC Three Carrier Corp and another v Arab Maritime Petroleum Transport Company [2021] EWHC 551 (Comm), the English High Court (Commercial Court) (the “Court”) emphasized that a term can only be implied into a contract if it is of commercial necessity.
Back to top